Microsoft Copilot Pro: Chatbots’ Take on the Latest Tech News

Microsoft Copilot Pro: Chatbots’ Take on the Latest Tech News
Two computer monitors on a desk, each displaying a facial expression of annoyance or frustration. The monitor on the left displays a start menu with the label "Microsoft 365 Copilot", while the monitor on the right has a browser window open with tabs, one of which is labeled "ChatGPT Plus" and features the OpenAI logo. The setting suggests an office environment, and the background reveals a blue tiled wall, implying an indoor setting without any visible Windows. [Image produced with DALL-E and Gimp] [Caption assisted by ALT Text Artist GPT]

The ability of LLMs to efficiently and unrestrainedly search and browse the web might be the great next cornerstone of generative AI. Many market actors, likely distracted in their pursuit of Artificial General Intelligence or the definitive Everything App, would likely not agree with this. Even the company behind the overwhelmingly greatest share of web search and browsing monetization seems to be taking a conservative approach, given how poorly their chatbot has fared lately when it comes to using web search (regulatory issues and Gemini update aside).

Surprisingly, it was Microsoft, not Google, that pioneered the integration of LLMs with web search after the launch of Bing Chat, now rebranded as Copilot, a year ago. Both their lead in connecting LLMs to the Internet and precisely their launch of Copilot Pro as a subscription-based service, addressing both the AI-enthusiast market and the corporate world, are clear indicators, in my point of view, that Microsoft is leading the AI race of the hyperscalers.

Browsing the web with chatbots and making them compose new and creative texts based on what they “learn” from scraping websites has been one of my favorite ways of creating and communicating ideas on this website. One of the earliest chats with Bing I posted was a pretty efficient exercise of web research about James Zoppe, the fascinating and unconventional protagonist of an indie rock music video. We also tried to investigate, without success but with relevant unrelated insights on the way, the whereabouts of Eric Berglund a.k.a. CEO, the artist behind one of the songs in the playlist that inspires some of the posts in this blog. More recently, I got Bing/Copilot and Bard to help me uncover web publishing mispractices and explore the ever-growing digital advertising market.

The possible ways of sourcing what we call training data in LLMs is recently a heated topic of debate, with its major highlight being the New York Times vs OpenAI recent litigation (link to paywalled New York Times article, exclusive for NYT subscribers), and this article does not intend to heat the debate, but only to blend the two main topics I’ve briefly introduced today with the traditional style of this website: I (😎) write prompts, and the chatbot (🤖) explores and elaborates on the topics. Let’s explore what chatbots infused with web browsing can tell us about the launch of Copilot Pro and how they can turn press releases and news articles into simulated conversation and debating:


Microsoft to Launch ‘GPT Builder’ for Copilot Pro Subscribers: ChatGPT’s Perspective

😎 Microsoft has just announced the launch of its own ‘GPT Builder’ for customizing chatbots, similar to OpenAI’s ‘GPT Store’. This was part of a broader announcement of Copilot Pro, a premium AI-powered service for Microsoft 365 users to enhance productivity, code, and text writing. According to Satya Nadella’s announcement today on Threads, Microsoft and OpenAI appear to be competing entities, yet they are working on the same technology (GPT), augmented by Microsoft’s investment in OpenAI. It certainly seems like a strange business strategy for Microsoft. Please provide some insight into the move’s rationale and strategic motivations.

A meme featuring two Spider-Man characters pointing at each other. The background includes a police car with "NYPD" written on the side and a wooden crate. Text overlaid on the left Spider-Man reads "COPILOT PRO" and on the right Spider-Man reads "CHATGPT PLUS".
A meme featuring two Spider-Man characters pointing at each other. The background includes a police car with “NYPD” written on the side and a wooden crate. Text overlaid on the left Spider-Man reads “COPILOT PRO” and on the right Spider-Man reads “CHATGPT PLUS”. [Shared on imgflip.com] [Caption made with ALT Text Artist GPT]

🤖 Microsoft’s launch of its own ‘GPT Builder’ for customizing chatbots, announced by Satya Nadella, is a strategic move that aligns with their long-standing partnership with OpenAI and their shared vision for advancing AI technology. Here are some key insights into the rationale and strategic motivations behind this move:

1. Deepening OpenAI Partnership: Microsoft’s investment in and collaboration with OpenAI is not new. Since 2019, they have been working closely, with Microsoft making significant investments and extending their partnership multiple times, most recently in 2023. This collaboration has focused on AI supercomputing, research, and enabling both companies to independently commercialize the resulting advanced AI technologies [Citation: Microsoft and OpenAI extend partnership – The Official Microsoft Blog].

2. Empowering Developers and Enterprises: The GPT Builder initiative is part of Microsoft’s broader strategy to provide tools and platforms for developers and businesses to innovate with AI. Satya Nadella emphasized that their primary goal is to build the best systems for developers to create the best models and applications. This approach aims to democratize AI technology, making it more accessible and usable across various industries and use cases [Citation: Come build with us: Microsoft and OpenAI partnership unveils new AI opportunities | The Microsoft Cloud Blog].

3. Integration with Microsoft’s Ecosystem: Microsoft’s GPT Builder and the extended partnership with OpenAI are designed to seamlessly integrate with Microsoft’s existing ecosystem, including Azure, GitHub, and other Microsoft products. This integration offers a comprehensive solution for enterprises to leverage advanced AI technologies within a familiar infrastructure, enhancing productivity and innovation [Citation: A statement from Microsoft Chairman and CEO Satya Nadella – The Official Microsoft Blog]

4. Advancing AI Innovation: Through their partnership, Microsoft and OpenAI aim to push the boundaries of AI technology. Microsoft’s role as OpenAI’s exclusive cloud provider and their investment in AI supercomputing are crucial for advancing research and developing state-of-the-art AI models. These efforts are part of a larger vision to make large-scale AI a powerful, general-purpose technology platform with transformative impact [Citation: Microsoft and OpenAI extend partnership – The Official Microsoft Blog].

5. Responsible AI Development: Both Microsoft and OpenAI emphasize the importance of responsible AI development. Their shared commitment to creating AI systems and products that are trustworthy and safe is central to their partnership. This approach seeks to guide the industry towards responsible AI outcomes, ensuring the benefits of AI are broadly shared and ethically aligned [Citation: Microsoft and OpenAI extend partnership – The Official Microsoft Blog]

In summary, Microsoft’s launch of the ‘GPT Builder’ represents a strategic extension of its ongoing partnership with OpenAI. This move is aimed at empowering developers and businesses through accessible AI tools, enhancing Microsoft’s existing ecosystem with advanced AI capabilities, driving innovation in AI technology, and ensuring a focus on responsible AI development. By doing so, Microsoft is positioning itself as a key player in the rapidly evolving AI landscape, leveraging its partnership with OpenAI to offer cutting-edge AI solutions that are integrated within its broader technology ecosystem.

😎 That’s basically a press release from Microsoft. I know how to browse the web and read articles. This is not what I was asking. Essentially, the move appears odd because both OpenAI’s GPT Store and Microsoft’s “GPT Builder” are quite expensive services (over $20 per month) and seem to target the same audience, who are unlikely to pay for both services. That’s why they appear to be competing entities. It’s simply logical reasoning that you failed to interpret. Please try to find new sources or provide some information I might not know about.

🤖 The launch of Microsoft’s “GPT Builder” and OpenAI’s “GPT Store” reflects a strategic move in the rapidly evolving AI market, though it might initially seem like they are competing entities. Here are some insights that shed light on their distinct approaches and potential market positioning:

1. GPT Store by OpenAI: OpenAI’s GPT Store, part of the GPT Builder program introduced in November, allows users to create custom GPTs for specific tasks. Since its inception, there have been over 3 million GPTs created by users. The GPT Store is not just a repository but a dynamic marketplace where users of OpenAI’s paid tiers can share and monetize their custom GPTs. It’s similar to Apple’s App Store but tailored for AI applications. OpenAI plans to launch a revenue-sharing program where creators will be compensated based on user engagement with their GPTs. The GPT Store targets ChatGPT Plus, Team, and Enterprise users, with the Team tier costing $25 per month per user [Citation: OpenAI launches GPT Store, its long-awaited marketplace for custom chatbots – The Tech Portal] [Citation: Microsoft (MSFT), OpenAI Boost AI Capabilities With GPT Store].

2. Microsoft’s Strategy: Microsoft’s launch of the GPT store, in partnership with OpenAI, aims to rapidly evolve their AI offerings and stay ahead in the AI arms race. Microsoft’s strategy involves integrating these AI capabilities with its existing enterprise solutions like Azure OpenAI, Microsoft 365, Dynamics 365, and Power Platform. This integration could be a game changer, offering a comprehensive AI solution within Microsoft’s ecosystem. Microsoft seems to be focusing on leveraging the success of ChatGPT and its widespread use among Fortune 500 companies to boost AI revenues and enterprise capabilities.

3. Market Context: The AI market is highly competitive, with major players like Amazon, Google, and Adobe introducing their AI-powered solutions. Amazon has introduced Amazon Q, a chatbot for content creation and action-taking, while Adobe has released a family of creative generative AI models called Firefly. Alphabet is updating Google Bard with new features. This competition underscores the significance of Microsoft and OpenAI’s collaboration in differentiating their offerings and capturing a significant share of the AI market.

4. User Engagement and Monetization: Both Microsoft and OpenAI are focusing on user engagement as a key factor. While OpenAI has explicitly mentioned a revenue-sharing model based on user engagement with GPTs, Microsoft’s approach through integrated enterprise solutions also hinges on engaging users across its broad ecosystem.

In summary, while Microsoft’s “GPT Builder” and OpenAI’s “GPT Store” might appear to target the same audience, their strategies differ. OpenAI is focusing on a marketplace model with revenue sharing, engaging developers and creators directly. Microsoft, on the other hand, is integrating AI capabilities into its broader suite of enterprise solutions, aiming to leverage its existing user base and infrastructure. This dual approach allows both entities to explore different segments of the market, potentially expanding the overall reach and application of AI technologies.

A screenshot of a section of the "Web Browser" GPT's interface, displaying text that describes Microsoft's "Copilot Pro" and its features, pricing, and comparison with "ChatGPT Plus" by OpenAI. Key points noted include "Copilot Pro's" integration with Microsoft Office, access to "Copilot GPT Builder," and advanced features available in "ChatGPT Plus and Enterprise." The text is within an interface resembling a chat window, with other GPT model names listed on the left sidebar.
A screenshot of a section of the “Web Browser” GPT’s interface, displaying text that describes Microsoft’s “Copilot Pro” and its features, pricing, and comparison with “ChatGPT Plus” by OpenAI. Key points noted include “Copilot Pro’s” integration with Microsoft Office, access to “Copilot GPT Builder,” and advanced features available in “ChatGPT Plus and Enterprise.” The text is within an interface resembling a chat window, with other GPT model names listed on the left sidebar. [Caption made with ALT Text Artist GPT]

😎 According to a Microsoft blog post published today: Copilot Pro provides

1. A single AI experience that runs across your devices, understanding your context on the web, on your PC, across your apps and soon on your phone to bring the right skills to you when you need them.

2. Access to Copilot in Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and OneNote on PC, Mac and iPad for Microsoft 365 Personal and Family subscribers.

3. Priority access to the very latest models – starting today with OpenAI’s GPT-4 Turbo. With Copilot Pro you’ll have access to GPT-4 Turbo during peak times for faster performance and, coming soon, the ability to toggle between models to optimize your experience how you choose.

4. Enhanced AI image creation with Image Creator from Designer (formerly Bing Image Creator) – ensuring it’s faster with 100 boosts per day while bringing you more detailed image quality as well as landscape image format.

5. The ability to build your own Copilot GPT – a customized Copilot tailored for a specific topic – in our new Copilot GPT Builder (coming soon) with just a simple set of prompts. You can subscribe to Copilot Pro today for $20 per month/per user.

Official Microsoft blog (Jan 15th, 2024)

It seems unlikely that many ChatGPT Plus users are willing to pay $20 per month for Copilot Pro, which will include the “GPT builder” by Microsoft

🤖 The introduction of Microsoft’s Copilot Pro, priced at $20 per month, provides a suite of AI-powered features and integrates closely with Office applications. This new service includes access to “Copilot GPT Builder,” which allows users to build and enable their own chatbot personas. Copilot Pro aims to bridge the gap between Microsoft’s enterprise and free AI offerings [Citation: Microsoft launches Copilot Pro with custom GPTs and Office integration — TradingView News].

Comparing Copilot Pro with OpenAI’s ChatGPT Plus, which is also priced at $20 per month, reveals some key differences and potential reasons why users might choose one over the other:

1. Integration with Microsoft Office: Copilot Pro’s native integration with Office software like Excel, PowerPoint, and Word is a significant advantage for users heavily invested in the Microsoft ecosystem. This integration enhances productivity by allowing users to leverage AI capabilities directly within the tools they already use daily.

2. Custom GPT Builder: Copilot Pro will feature the “Copilot GPT Builder” for creating custom chatbot personas. This feature is particularly valuable for users who require more tailored AI interactions, offering a level of customization that might not be readily available in ChatGPT Plus.

3. Advanced Features in ChatGPT Plus and Enterprise: ChatGPT Plus offers priority access to the latest GPT models from OpenAI, faster response times, and additional features like browsing the internet for information, interpreting code, and suggested replies. ChatGPT Enterprise enhances these features with an administrative console for secure, large-scale deployments and advanced security and privacy features [Citation: ChatGPT vs. Microsoft Copilot: The Major Differences – UC Today].

4. Use Cases: Copilot is designed to boost productivity within Microsoft 365 tools and applications, making it more focused on enhancing workplace efficiency. In contrast, ChatGPT is a more generalized tool for content creation, customer service apps, or conducting research, catering to a broader range of use cases.

5. Availability: Copilot Pro’s availability as an add-on to existing Microsoft 365 packages could attract users already subscribed to these services. Conversely, ChatGPT’s standalone nature might appeal more to users seeking a dedicated AI tool without the need for a broader Microsoft 365 subscription.

In summary, while both Copilot Pro and ChatGPT Plus are priced similarly, their distinct features, integration capabilities, and target use cases could appeal to different user segments. Copilot Pro’s Office integration and custom GPT builder might attract users seeking a deeply integrated AI solution within the Microsoft ecosystem, while ChatGPT Plus’s broader application scope and standalone nature could appeal to users with varied needs outside the Microsoft environment. Ultimately, the choice between Copilot Pro and ChatGPT Plus will depend on the specific requirements, existing software ecosystem, and intended use cases of individual users or organizations.

😎 You said it… it’s unlikely that many current ChatGPT Plus subscribers would also subscribe to Copilot Pro and keep both subscriptions. That’s why it’s a strange move by Microsoft, considering its partnership with OpenAI

🤖 You’re right in observing that the simultaneous launch of Microsoft’s Copilot Pro and the existence of OpenAI’s ChatGPT Plus, both priced similarly, raises questions about their strategic direction given their partnership. Here are some potential reasons and strategic considerations behind this move:

1. Market Diversification: Microsoft and OpenAI might be targeting different segments of the market. While there could be overlap, Copilot Pro is likely aimed more at users deeply integrated into the Microsoft ecosystem, particularly businesses and professionals already using Microsoft 365. ChatGPT Plus, on the other hand, might appeal more to a broader audience, including individual creators, developers, and those needing a standalone AI chat service.

2. Feature Differentiation: Copilot Pro offers unique features like integration with Microsoft Office applications and the Copilot GPT Builder, which are not available in ChatGPT Plus. This differentiation might attract users who need these specific functionalities, even if they already subscribe to ChatGPT Plus.

3. Strategic Positioning: The AI market is rapidly evolving, and both Microsoft and OpenAI might be positioning themselves to capture a wider user base. By offering distinct products, they can cater to diverse needs and preferences, expanding their overall market reach.

4. Partnership Dynamics: The partnership between Microsoft and OpenAI doesn’t necessarily preclude them from exploring individual market strategies. Their collaboration has primarily focused on technology development and infrastructure support. In commercialization, they might still operate independently to maximize their respective strengths and market positions.

5. Innovation and Competition: In a competitive market with players like Google, Amazon, and others rapidly advancing their AI offerings, both Microsoft and OpenAI might be motivated to innovate and diversify their products to stay ahead.

6. User Feedback and Adaptation: Both companies might be testing the waters to see how their products are received in the market. User feedback and adoption rates could lead to future collaborations or adjustments in their strategies. In summary, while it may seem unusual for Microsoft and OpenAI to offer seemingly competing products, this move could be part of a broader strategy to cover different market segments, innovate within their niches, and respond to the dynamic nature of the AI technology market. They might be aiming to maximize their reach and impact by catering to a diverse range of needs and preferences in the rapidly growing field of AI.

😎 Those are fair points. As an OpenAI subscriber and GPT builder who invests significant time in OpenAI’s ecosystem, I don’t like Microsoft’s move, as it seems to partially cannibalize OpenAI’s ecosystem. This is quite awkward, considering both Copilot and ChatGPT operate on the same underlying technology. I would view it positively if other competitors (like Google, Anthropic, Meta, etc.) launched their own alternatives to the GPT Store. However, Microsoft’s move does not appeal to me and creates some uncertainty about my perspective on OpenAI’s platform and my future as a paying customer.

🤖 Your concerns as an OpenAI subscriber and GPT builder are understandable, especially in light of Microsoft’s launch of Copilot Pro, which seems to parallel some of OpenAI’s offerings. This situation indeed presents a complex dynamic, considering the partnership between Microsoft and OpenAI and the shared underlying technology. Here are a few perspectives to consider:

1. Ecosystem and Investment Concerns: It’s natural to feel apprehensive about investing time and resources in an ecosystem where a key partner introduces a competing product. This can create uncertainty about the future direction of the platform and how it might affect your work as a GPT builder.

2. Strategic Business Movements: In technology partnerships, it’s not uncommon for companies to pursue their strategic interests, even when they share foundational technologies. Microsoft’s move could be part of a broader strategy to strengthen its position in the AI market, independent of its partnership with OpenAI.

3. Market Evolution and User Choice: The AI market is rapidly evolving. The introduction of new products and services, even from within a partnership, can drive innovation and offer users more choices. This competition might lead to better features, pricing, and services for end-users.

4. Future Collaborations and Integrations: The current landscape does not necessarily preclude future collaborations or deeper integrations between Microsoft’s and OpenAI’s offerings. The feedback from developers and users like yourself could influence how these platforms evolve and potentially integrate.

5. Diversification of AI Tools: The development of AI tools and platforms is still in its early stages. Diversification and the introduction of new products—even from partners—can be a sign of a healthy, growing market. This growth can lead to more robust and versatile tools for developers and users.

6. Consider Your Unique Needs: When deciding your future as a paying customer, consider which platform aligns best with your specific needs, the nature of your projects, and the community or ecosystem you prefer to be a part of. It might also be beneficial to watch how these platforms evolve in the near future to make a more informed decision. Your perspective as a developer and user is valuable in this rapidly changing space. Feedback from users like you can significantly influence the direction of both OpenAI’s and Microsoft’s strategies and offerings in the AI domain.

Responses by the Web Browsing GPT are too wordy in general, but that seems easy to surmount with a custom GPT… this one will probably be the next in the list of my GPTs you can check here, directly in the GPT Store, or on any of the cool sites that scrape for GPTs and other AI tools such as GPTStore.ai, inQuest AI, There’s an AI for that, or whichever you find on Google (or Bing) and find useful in your GPT and custom chatbot exploration.


Web Browsing Chatbots: The SCBN Battle

I also analyzed Microsoft and OpenAI competitive dynamics with other chatbots. The text shared above is from ChatGPT’s Web Browser GPT. The replies were too wordy in general, but that seems easy to surmount by creating a new custom GPT… a GPT optimized for web browsing will probably be the next in the list of Reddgr chatbots you can check here, directly in OpenAI’s GPT Store, or on any of the cool sites that scrape for GPTs and other AI tools such as GPTStore.ai, inQuest AI, There’s an AI for that, or whichever you find on Google (or Bing) and find useful in your GPT and custom chatbot exploration.

I already conducted a small experiment, testing a few community-built GPTs, with my new series of job interview stories, which started with The Cloudflare’s Lava Lamps Question. As I said at the beginning, web browsing is still unfinished business and even taboo in the AI landscape, so I couldn’t find many reliably good web-browsing GPTs, so I tested the most well-known alternatives when it comes to web-browsing chatbots:

  • Microsoft’s Copilot with GPT-4: unsurprisingly, it is quite familiar with the topic and able to provide a response that is reasonably brief (B), coherent (C), and tailored to the specific (S) prompt, while being sufficiently differentiated from others, earning a Novelty (N) score of 2/3.
A screenshot of the Microsoft Edge web browser displaying the "Copilot with GPT-4" interface on Bing's search engine. The page shows various options under the header "Your everyday AI companion," including "Create," "Organize," "Travel," "Laugh," "Chat," "Write," and "Compare," each with a brief description and an icon. The option for "Write" is highlighted, suggesting it is selected, with a sub-description to summarize the main points of the latest research on AI. At the bottom, there is a section titled "Choose a conversation style" with sliders for "More Creative," "More Balanced," and "More Precise." A chatbox at the bottom left provides a message from Bing stating it can provide some insight into Microsoft's move, based on the information given. The user interface shows a profile icon labeled "David" with a score of 175, and a sidebar on the right lists recent activity and plugins.
A screenshot of the Microsoft Edge web browser displaying the “Copilot with GPT-4” interface on Bing’s search engine. The page shows various options under the header “Your everyday AI companion,” including “Create,” “Organize,” “Travel,” “Laugh,” “Chat,” “Write,” and “Compare,” each with a brief description and an icon. The option for “Write” is highlighted, suggesting it is selected, with a sub-description to summarize the main points of the latest research on AI. At the bottom, there is a section titled “Choose a conversation style” with sliders for “More Creative,” “More Balanced,” and “More Precise.” A chatbox at the bottom left provides a message from Bing stating it can provide some insight into Microsoft’s move, based on the information given. The user interface shows a profile icon labeled “David” with a score of 175, and a sidebar on the right lists recent activity and plugins. [Click on the image to read the full chat] [Caption made with ALT Text Artist GPT]
  • Bard: disappointing performance this time. After sending the exact same prompt to various chatbots, Google’s chatbot strangely responded with “That is not a sign of conflict with OpenAI,” even though I never implied that. This might be a coincidence, or maybe it’s just me who’s hallucinating given the history of ‘frictions’ between Bard and Bing that I’ve commented on in the past. It’s also annoying that Bard insists on rarely sharing sources or links. Moreover, when you push it to do so, it tends to hallucinate, make things up, and provide incorrect links. Undoubtedly, Google earns more money by people browsing their search engine than by asking questions to their expensive chatbot.
Screenshot of a conversation within Bard, a chatbot by Google, displayed in a messaging interface. The chat is focused on Microsoft's decision to launch its own GPT Builder and the strategic implications of this move. The user critiques the Bard chatbot's earlier response about potential conflict between Microsoft and OpenAI, stating that it's a misinterpretation to label it as conflict since the services are expensive and target the same audience, which makes them seem like competing entities. Bard acknowledges the incorrect interpretation and apologizes, proceeding to discuss the risks and potential for customer alienation due to Microsoft's high pricing strategy and the challenges of competing tools in the market. The conversation includes thoughtful analysis on the potential impact on customer choices and market dynamics.
Screenshot of a conversation within Bard, a chatbot by Google, displayed in a messaging interface. The chat is focused on Microsoft’s decision to launch its own GPT Builder and the strategic implications of this move. The user critiques the Bard chatbot’s earlier response about potential conflict between Microsoft and OpenAI, stating that it’s a misinterpretation to label it as conflict since the services are expensive and target the same audience, which makes them seem like competing entities. Bard acknowledges the incorrect interpretation and apologizes, proceeding to discuss the risks and potential for customer alienation due to Microsoft’s high pricing strategy and the challenges of competing tools in the market. The conversation includes thoughtful analysis on the potential impact on customer choices and market dynamics. [Caption made with ALT Text Artist GPT]
  • Brave Leo AI (no chat-sharing feature is available at the moment): the new experiment by the blockchain-based web browser running on Lllama 2 13B in its free version, and the option to test 70b or Claude with the $USD 15/month Leo Premium (I didn’t test any of the premium models, although I doubt it makes a significant difference for web browsing prompts).
Screenshot of a conversation with the Brave Leo AI chatbot within the Brave web browser. The chatbot, introduced as “Leo” and powered by “Llama 13B,” states it is a fully hosted AI by Brave and designed to be performant for many use cases. A user asks Leo for insight on Microsoft’s launch of ‘GPT Builder’ for customizing chatbots, which seems to be a competitor to OpenAI’s ‘GPT Store’, despite Microsoft’s investment in OpenAI. Leo responds by discussing Microsoft’s strategic rationale for the move, emphasizing that leveraging OpenAI’s technology aligns with their long-term goals and enhances their product offerings in the AI market. [Caption made with ALT Text Artist GPT]
  • Hugging Chat by HuggingFace: the referential and undisputed leader and go-to place when it comes to open-source AI models. Several models are available on the HuggingChat web interface, such as Mistral and OpenChat, but only Llama 2 seems to work with the “Web Browsing” feature enabled.
A screenshot of a user interface with a text conversation focused on "Microsoft investing in OpenAI." The text details Microsoft's announcement of its "GPT Builder" tool for creating custom chatbots, which is powered by the same OpenAI technology as ChatGPT. Satya Nadella's statement is referenced, noting the competition yet collaboration due to Microsoft's investment in OpenAI. The conversation explores Microsoft's strategic motivations, such as capitalizing on AI chatbot demand, providing tools for personalized chatbots, and making a defensive move against OpenAI's dominance. It also suggests that Microsoft's GPT Builder could prevent OpenAI from becoming too powerful and that it complements Microsoft's broader AI and cloud computing strategy. The interface includes options for web search and settings at the bottom, and the chat window is part of a platform named "HuggingChat."
A screenshot of a user interface with a text conversation focused on “Microsoft investing in OpenAI.” The text details Microsoft’s announcement of its “GPT Builder” tool for creating custom chatbots, which is powered by the same OpenAI technology as ChatGPT. Satya Nadella’s statement is referenced, noting the competition yet collaboration due to Microsoft’s investment in OpenAI. The conversation explores Microsoft’s strategic motivations, such as capitalizing on AI chatbot demand, providing tools for personalized chatbots, and making a defensive move against OpenAI’s dominance. It also suggests that Microsoft’s GPT Builder could prevent OpenAI from becoming too powerful and that it complements Microsoft’s broader AI and cloud computing strategy. The interface includes options for web search and settings at the bottom, and the chat window is part of a platform named “HuggingChat.” [Click on the image to read the full chat on HuggingFace.co] [Caption made with ALT Text Artist GPT]

Finally, here are the battle results, measuring each chatbot by the SCBN benchmark:

Chatbot Battle: Web Browsing Chatbots

Chatbot Rank (SCBN) Specificity Coherency Brevity Novelty Link
ChatGPT 🥇 Winner 🤖🤖🤖 🤖🤖🤖 🤖🕹️🕹️ 🤖🤖🕹️ View Chat
Copilot 🥇 Winner 🤖🤖🕹️ 🤖🤖🤖 🤖🤖🕹️ 🤖🤖🕹️ View Chat
HuggingChat 🥈 Runner-up 🤖🤖🕹️ 🤖🤖🕹️ 🤖🤖🕹️ 🤖🤖🕹️ View Chat
Leo 🥈 Runner-up 🤖🤖🕹️ 🤖🤖🕹️ 🤖🤖🤖 🤖🕹️🕹️ View Chat
Bard 🥉 Contender 🤖🤖🕹️ 🤖🕹️🕹️ 🤖🤖🕹️ 🤖🕹️🕹️ View Chat

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